COVID19

COVID-19 Cools Melrose Place Shopping and Selfie Scene

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Used to be there was never an open parking spot on L.A.’s buzzy Melrose Place. Now there are so many, the valet stands aren’t even operating.

On a recent morning, there was still a line for matcha lattes at Alfred Coffee, but it was mostly Postmates, and a mother-daughter team was taking Instagram glamour shots — in front of a storefront vacated after Bldwn filed for bankruptcy in March.

For years, the walkable leafy thoroughfare has been second only to Rodeo Drive as the epicenter of high-end fashion and retail in Los Angeles. The name Melrose Place has become such a mythic SoCal locale (like Malibu) that it was recently trademarked for a clothing line. But walking it now, seeing what’s open and what’s not, and what’s never going to open again, brings into focus the retail devastation the pandemic has wrought.

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How Should Fashion Entrants to China Approach COVID-19 Rebound?

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LONDON — Everybody wants a slice of China’s booming luxury and fashion market, especially after the coronavirus put a stop to many businesses around the world.

It’s indeed fascinating to hear stories about how loyal Chinese consumers would queue outside Chanel and Hermès stores moments after the pandemic was contained and spend a record-breaking sum of money on high-price items, and how Burberry’s 100 limited-edition Pocket Bags in collaboration with Mr. Bags sold out within 44 seconds on his WeChat mini-program.

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McKinsey predicts Chinese consumers will account for 40 percent of the world’s luxury spending by 2025, but the growing demand is likely to be trapped in the country until 2021 due to pandemic disruptions. Because of this, China’s retail market is expected to overtake the U.S. and become the world’s largest as early as this year.

But

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